Blogs

A new way to explore our ocean, minus the wetsuit!

Imagine knife-edge structures as tall as skyscrapers; giant pinnacles undamaged by the erosion of their land-based counterparts; chasms barely wide enough to swim through; ledges dropping into unfathomable depths; topography that was above water during the last ice age...

An anniversary to remember

On Friday afternoon April 30,  I preceded my husband Larry toward the  overlook on Sea Lion Point Trail.  A young couple came frolicking down the trail toward me.  I asked if they had seen the whales blowing as I gestured toward the ocean.  They stopped and made an abrupt about-face toward the overlook.  When I joined them,  I pointed to the blows.  A small group began to form.  Then the whales began to breach.  We were all delighted  but  Larry's cooler demeanor prevailed .  He called to alert the folks at the Info Statio

Where's my baby?

Last Saturday I headed out to the Sea Lion Cove overlook to see what I could see. The pelagic cormorants were refurbishing their cliffside nests with seaweed, the sea lions were talking loudly about whatever it is they find to talk about, and the guillemots were showing off their resplendent feet.  Down by the left front edge of the big flat rock there was a mother and pup pair of harbor seals lounging.  Then another pair appeared just below them, with that mom apparently thinking the other mom up on top had had a good idea.

A boy scout's good deed

On a bird walk for docent trainees, Carrieanna Hess, a trainee who uses a wheelchair told a heartwarming story as we started up the ADA trail from the Bird Island parking lot.  In early April she had been starting up the same section of trail toward the restroom, moving slowly and working hard to roll in her manual wheelchair up the incline.  Some grandparents with their three grandchildren  were enjoying a picnic at a nearby table, when the 12-year-old, a Boy Scout from Livermore, came over to ask if he could help her.  She accepted with enthusiastic gratitude, and aske

Otters, otters, and more otters

My public walk group, which consisted of one couple from Grass Valley and three trainee "shadows", had no idea what was in store for them when we set out on the Cypress Grove Trail on Friday.  It started slowly enough with two otters in Headland Cove; they were a bit difficult to see but good enough to avoid giving the visitors a full refund for the tour.  Then we saw a mom and pup and another individual not far from South Point, and a raft of about a dozen further out.  Next we saw three more otters motoring along near the Pinnacle.

A docent trainee's favorite things

As part of my Docent training I’ve been attending topical guided walks, station openings and closings and just walking the trails. There are many wonderful things to see at Point Lobos but my favorite images are the smiles that stretch the faces of so many visitors. The beauty of the Reserve is almost irresistible and very few folks can spend a few hours walking the trails and not leave the cares of their daily lives behind. The same is true for me and that’s why I look forward to the hours I spend at Point Lobos.  by Jack Olver

Announcing the next great parks and conservation landscape

Heads of the Big Sur Land Trust, Monterey Peninsula Regional Parks District, the Point Lobos Foundation and the Monterey District of California State Parks signed a memorandum of understanding on April 9 to further parks between Carmel and Big Sur.

Great White Shark sighting

Ranger Dan forwarded a diver's Flicker postings of a dive to Marco's Pinnacle (just outside Bluefish Cove).  Check out this photo and this video.

Four otters seen on island

I had a great time scoping at Bird Island this morning.  I have previously seen otters hauled out here and there at Point Lobos before, but was amazed this morning to see FOUR otters hauled out together on a rock just north of Bird Island.  There were two moms and their pups!  They were on the rock for quite a while before a pesky Western Gull pestered them past their tolerance level, and they headed into the water.  The white faces of the moms are clearly evident in the photo.

Precious moment at Point Lobos

A memorable experience happened when a six year old Japanese boy shyly walked up the trail where I had a scope set up during an Easy Access Adventure. With the scope adjusted to its lowest height, I got down on one knee to get face to face with this young man. I told him this scope is set up just for people his size, and then asked him if he could say harbor seal. The child looked up at his Dad and his father said go ahead. "Harbor seal" he said with a smile on his face, his parents gleaming.